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GREEN PUBLIC PROCUREMENT

GPP
Green Public Procurement (GPP), known in Italy as “Green Procurement for Public Administrations”, is a concept that originated from the OECD and was subsequently confirmed by the European Union and by the laws of member countries.

It encourages the Public Administration to concern itself with the environmental impact generated by the products and services it acquires in the course of its duties.


It encourages the Public Administration to concern itself with the environmental impact generated by the products and services it acquires in the course of its duties.

 

Quite simply, there are two forms of reduction of pollution from waste:

  • prevention: try to produce less waste
  • separate collection and recycling: making sure that any waste is less polluting.

That’s why both Italian and international legislation goes in a specific direction: to encourage businesses to buy recycled material.

The encouragement is to choose “those products and services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment compared to other products and services used for the same purpose” (U.S. EPA 1995). The demand for environmental qualification requirements by the PA promotes the market for green products, setting in motion a virtuous circle.

In Italy, spending on public procurement is not negligible: it accounts for 17% of GDP. Starting to consider the environmental impact of individual products throughout their life cycle – that is, from the procurement of raw materials to the disposal of waste – is the first step in implementing real strategies for sustainable development.

In Italy there are rules that go in this direction.

Ministerial Decree 203 of 8/5/2003, for example, urges local authorities to source a share of at least 30% of goods produced from recycled materials for its annual needs. Schools, organisations, public administrations, stations… All entities that, in accordance with the regulations, should observe a share of 30% of recycled material for their purchases, from paper to furniture.

Even France is taking a precise orientation, with the obligation to recycle bulky items, and therefore also furniture, injecting into the market products obtained from recycled material. The percentage targets imposed by law are rather stringent and this can cause problems for producers: think of glass, which is difficult to recycle in a cabinet. Here the use of 100% recycled wood panels, by considerably increasing the percentage of recycled material on the total, facilitates the achievement of the target provided by law.

TORNA SU